RICHARD BAXTER 8 December 2016

RICHARD BAXTER

PASTOR AND WRITER, 1691

Richard BaxterRichard Baxter (12 November 1615 – 8 December 1691) was an English Puritan church leader, theologian and controversialist, called by Dean Stanley “the chief of English Protestant Schoolmen”. After some false starts, he made his reputation by his ministry at Kidderminster, and at around the same time began a long and prolific career as theological writer. After the Restoration he refused preferment [i. e., an appointment within the Church of England], while retaining a non-separatist presbyterian approach, and became one of the most influential leaders of the nonconformists, spending time in prison.

His ministry at Kidderminster continued, with many interruptions, for about nineteen years; and during that time he accomplished many reforms. He formed the ministers in the country around him into an association, uniting them irrespective of their differences as Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Independents. The Reformed Pastor was a book which Baxter published in relation to the general ministerial efforts he promoted.

On the outbreak of the English Civil War, Baxter blamed both parties and recommended the Protestation, an attempt to avert civil war. In 1647, Baxter was staying at the home of Lady Rouse, wife of Sir Thomas Rouse, 1st Baronet, of Rouse Lench in Warwickshire. There, though debilitated by illness, he wrote the most of a major work, The Saints’ Everlasting Rest (1650).[continue]


James Kiefer. 2015.Richard Baxter Pastor And Writer, 1691. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.satucket.com/lectionary/richard_baxter.htm. [Accessed 8 December 2016].
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