Chad bishop of Litchfield -2 March 2017

Saint Chad (Caedda), bishop of Mercia (Lichfield)
 († 672) Missionary

800px-st_chad_shrine_icon

More details;Icon used devotionally at the site of the shrine of St Chad in Lichfield Cathedral.

A first approach to the indigenous Orthodox Saints and Martyrs of the Ancient Church who lived and who propagated the Faith in the British Isles and Ireland during the first millennium of Christianity and prior to the Great Schism is being attempted in our website  in our desire to inform our readers, who may not be aware of the history, the labours or the martyrdom of this host of Orthodox Saints of the original One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church of our Lord.

“The Church in The British Isles will only begin to grow when she begins to venerate her own Saints”     (Saint Arsenios of Paros †1877)

Our father among the saints Chad of Lichfield and Mercia (+672) also called St. Caedda was a missionary, bishop, healer, and wonderworker who spread the Orthodox Catholic Faith throughout the British Isles. His feast day is commemorated on March 2.

The Simple Monastic

Everything we know of this great hierarch comes from the writings of St. Bede in his “Ecclesiastical History”, written in 731.

St. Chad, the youngest of four brothers, was born into a humble Northumbrian family near the beginning of the seventh century. His brothers, St. Cedd, St. Cynebil and righteous Caelin all became monks. A family of saints, these four men studied under the great sainted-hierarch and monk, Aidan of Lindisfarne. Saint Aidan was a great source of spiritual insight to these four men, all four became priests of the holy Church. They were sent to Ireland under the great geron (elder) and saint, Egbert, at the monastery of Rathmelsige (Melfont), for advanced study and training in the monastic life.

Chad worked tirelessly with his brother Cedd (who had been made bishop of London), they established the monastery of Laestingaeu, now Lastingham in Yorkshire. Upon the death of his brother Cedd in 664, Chad succeeded him as abbot.


 
 
 
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